CyberLaw Blog

A news resource for CyberLaw and Cyber-Rights issues from around the globe

Archive for February 24th, 2009

Three Strikes on Hold in New Zealand

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

Three Strikes on Hold in New Zealand: “Those living in New Zealand can breathe a bit easier today, as the controversial ‘three strikes’ P2P policy is currently on hold. The measure is designed to intimidate alleged P2P pirates with the threat that their internet connections will be permanently disconnected after three warnings.”

(Via Slyck.com File-Sharing News And Information.)

Eircom to block Pirate Bay

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

Eircom to block Pirate Bay: “

‘Automatic’ music label salute

Eircom, Ireland’s biggest internet provider, has agreed to block access to any website the music industry says is responsible for illegal music-swapping.…

(Via The Register – Public Sector.)

IE – Music-swapping sites to be blocked by internet providers

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

IE – Music-swapping sites to be blocked by internet providers: “(Sunday Post)
Irish internet users are to be blocked from accessing music swapping websites, as internet service providers bow to pressure from the music industry. Eircom, the country’s biggest internet provider, is to start blocking its internet customers from accessing music swapping. The country’s other internet providers have been told by the Irish Recorded Music Association (Irma) to follow suit or face legal action. If the music industry is successful, Ireland will become the first European country to completely block access to hundreds of file-sharing websites.”

(Via QuickLinks Update.)

Cloud Computing and Privacy

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

Cloud Computing and Privacy: “(World Privacy Forum)
Cloud computing involves the sharing or storage by users of their own information on remote servers owned or operated by others and accessed through the Internet or other connections. Privacy in the Clouds: Risks to Privacy and Confidentiality from Cloud Computing by Robert Gellman outlines its implications for the privacy of personal information as well as its implications for the confidentiality of business and governmental information. See also Cloud Computing Tips for Consumers, Business, and Government.”

(Via QuickLinks Update.)

US – Child porn damages precedent set

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

US – Child porn damages precedent set: “(BBC)
A British man living in the US has been told by a judge to pay $200,000 to a woman for possessing an indecent image of her as a child. The judge said it was the first such criminal case in which someone found possessing illegal images had to pay restitution, despite not creating them. Briton Alan Hesketh was sentenced to 78 months in prison in October.”

(Via QuickLinks Update.)

ID card reviews must be published, rules Information Tribunal again

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

ID card reviews must be published, rules Information Tribunal again: “The Government will have to publish controversial reports on its identity card scheme after the Information Tribunal backed the Information Commissioner’s order to publish at the end of a protracted legal wrangle.”

(Via OUT-LAW News.)

E-tailers can’t reclaim value of use of returned goods, says ECJ advisor

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

E-tailers can’t reclaim value of use of returned goods, says ECJ advisor: “Online retailers cannot reclaim some of the purchase price of goods even if they are returned after a long time and have given the user some benefit, an advocate general of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has said.”

(Via OUT-LAW News.)

BBC News: Online child abuse images warning

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

BBC News: Online child abuse images warning

Published: 2009/02/23 06:29:22 GMT

Children’s charities have expressed “serious concerns” many UK households still have access to images showing child sex abuse via their computers.

The government had asked all internet service providers (ISPs) to block illegal websites by the end of 2007. But firms providing 5% of broadband connections have still failed to act. One of them, Zen Internet, said in a statement: “We have not yet implemented the IWF’s recommended system because we have concerns over its effectiveness.”

It is understood other ISPs have cited the cost of blocking the illegal material as a reason not to participate in the scheme.

“ This is a battle over the merits of self-regulation versus legislation ”
Rory Cellan-Jones, BBC’s Technology correspondent

But the NSPCC’s Zoe Hilton said: “Allowing this loophole helps feed the appalling trade in images featuring real children being seriously sexually assaulted.” The blocked websites come from a list supplied by the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF), but some smaller providers refuse to use the list.

Easy access

The Children’s Charities Coalition on Internet Safety (CCCIS) says self-regulation is not working and it is calling for firmer action by the government.

Ms Hilton said: “Over 700,000 households in the UK can still get uninterrupted and easy access to illegal child abuse image sites.

“ The government is currently looking at ways to progress the final 5% ”, Home Office minister Alan Campbell

“We now need decisive action from the government to ensure the ISPs that are still refusing to block this foul material are forced to fall into line.

“Self-regulation on this issue is obviously failing – and in a seriously damaging way for children.”

Home Office Minister Alan Campbell said: “In 2006 the government stated that they wished to see 100% of consumer broadband connections covered by blocking, which includes images of child abuse, by the end of 2007.

“Currently in the UK, 95% of consumer broadband connections are covered by blocking. The government is currently looking at ways to progress the final 5%.”

UK – Online child abuse image warning

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

UK – Online child abuse image warning: “(BBC)
Children’s charities have expressed ’serious concerns’ many UK households still have access to images showing child sex abuse via their computers. The government had asked all internet service providers (ISPs) to block illegal websites by the end of 2007. But firms providing 5% of broadband connections have still failed to act. See also Can we block child abuse sites? (BBC).”

(Via QuickLinks Update.)

Index on Censorship: The Italian government is attempting to make web-based dissent a crime

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

Index on Censorship » Criminal minded

17Feb09 – 15:17

The Italian government is attempting to make web-based dissent a crime, says Cecilia Anesi

A new bill has come before the Senate, giving the interior ministry the power to order Internet providers to remove criminal content within 24 hours or face a fine of up to 250,000 euros.

This is not something happening in China or in Burma, but rather in Italy, a member of the European Union. Senator Gianpiero D’Alia introduced the measure after the Italian press reported on the existence of Facebook fan groups for convicted Corleone-born Mafia bosses Salvatore Riina and Bernardo Provenzano, who have been convicted of dozens of homicides and are serving multiple life sentences in prison.

After Facebook expressed its concern about Italy’s proposed law to force Internet providers to block access to websites that incite or justify criminal behaviour, D’Alia replied that the aim is not to block sites like Facebook or YouTube in their entirety if they contain criminal content. Rather, the senator explained, the law is intended to force them to remove individual pages or groups.

However, the text of the bill is misleading, as it does not distinguish between blocking pages and entire websites. This makes the law extremely flawed, as Marco Pancini, the European Public Policy Counsel for Google, which owns YouTube, has said. Internet providers are not able to eliminate single elements from websites, and this means blocking entire platforms in a situation where Internet providers themselves are not left with any choice but to respect orders for the removal of an unlawful site.
(more…)