CyberLaw Blog

A news resource for CyberLaw and Cyber-Rights issues from around the globe

Archive for March 5th, 2010

EU Data Protection Supervisor Warns Against ACTA, Calls 3 Strikes Disproportionate

Friday, March 5th, 2010

EU Data Protection Supervisor Warns Against ACTA, Calls 3 Strikes Disproportionate: “(Michael Geist)
Peter Hustinx, the European Data Protection Supervisor, has issued a 20-page opinion expressing concern about ACTA. The opinion focuses on three key issues: three strikes legislation, cross-border data sharing as part of enforcement initiatives, and transparency. Although the EDPS acknowledges the importance of enforcing intellectual property rights, he takes the view that a three strikes Internet disconnection policy constitutes a disproportionate measure. It can be questioned whether data transfers to third countries in the context of ACTA are legitimate. The principles of necessity and proportionality of the data transfers under ACTA would be more easily met if the agreement was expressly limited to fighting the most serious IPR infringement offences, instead of allowing for bulk data transfers relating to any suspicions of IPR infringements. The EDPS strongly encourages the European Commission to establish a public and transparent dialogue on ACTA, possibly by means of a public consultation.

(Via QuickLinks Update.)

Microsoft backs down over online spy guide

Friday, March 5th, 2010

Microsoft backs down over online 'spy guide': “(Guardian)
Microsoft has been forced to backtrack after it closed down a whistleblowing website after it published a leaked version of the company’s ’spy guide’. The American software giant took action against the Cryptome website for publishing a copy of the Microsoft Global Criminal Compliance Handbook, a document explaining how law enforcement officials can access millions of people’s private information online. Microsoft said the publication infringed its copyright and lodged a complaint with Cryptome’s web hosting company, Network Solutions. Network Solutions shut down the website entirely – a move that caused uproar among civil liberties campaigners, and led Microsoft to withdraw its complaint so that Cryptome could go back online. The company did not intend to close the site – just remove the document in question.

(Via QuickLinks Update.)

Major ACTA Leak: Internet and Civil Enforcement Chapters With Country Positions

Friday, March 5th, 2010

Major ACTA Leak: Internet and Civil Enforcement Chapters With Country Positions: “(Michal Geisnt)
On the heels of the leak of various country positions on ACTA transparency, an even bigger leak has hit the Internet. A new European Union document canvasses the Internet and Civil Enforcement chapters, disclosing in complete detail the proposals from the U.S., the counter-proposals from the EU, Japan, and other ACTA participants. The 44-page document also highlights specific concerns of individual countries on a wide range of issues including ISP liability, anti-circumvention rules, and the scope of the treaty. This is probably the most significant leak to-date since it goes even beyond the transparency debate by including specific country positions and proposals.

(Via QuickLinks Update.)