CyberLaw Blog

A news resource for CyberLaw and Cyber-Rights issues from around the globe

Archive for May 28th, 2008

Canadians Consider Using Border Guards to Enforce Copyright

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

It is not only Canadians by the way, US, Europeans, they seem to be all part of this secretive draft (and daft) Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement initiative which was leaked to Wikileaks.org.

Canadians Consider Using Border Guards to Enforce Copyright: “The Canadian government is secretly negotiating an agreement to revamp international copyright laws that could make information stored on iPods, laptops and other devices illegal, according to a leaked government document.”

(Via XBIZ.com | News & Articles.)

Google Fights for the Right to Hide Its Privacy Policy

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

Bits: Google Fights for the Right to Hide Its Privacy Policy: “Google refuses to put a link to its privacy policy on its home page, challenging the standards of an advertising industry self-regulatory group it wants to join.

(Via NYT > Technology.)

Note that with a simple search through Google you can find Google’s Privacy Policy, its Privacy Pages, as well as for example its UK Privacy Policy which is different and more up-to-date than the global one. I would have preferred Google to make it easier to locate its policy via direct link on its main search pages. Nevertheless, it does exist online and can be viewed by users but do not expect to read a detailed policy.

Belgian newspapers seek up to €49 million from Google in damages

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

Belgian newspapers seek up to €49 million from Google in damages: “The group of Belgian newspapers which is suing Google over its Google News service claims that Google’s alleged infringements have cost its members up to €49 million. The group, Copiepresse, wants Google to pay €4 million immediately.”

(Via OUT-LAW News.)

MoJ: New proposals will make all obscene images of children illegal

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

Ministry of Justice Press Release

New proposals will make all obscene images of children illegal – Ministry of Justice

Consultation on possession of non-photographic visual depictions of child sexual abuse [PDF 0.34mb, 25 pages]
Summary of responses and next steps [PDF 0.24mb, 28 pages]: The report summarises the responses received to the consultation, and describes how the consultation process has influenced the final shape of the policy and the conclusions we have reached on the terms, definitions and thresholds within the offence.

28 May 2008

All images of child sexual abuse, including drawings and computer-generated images of child abuse will be illegal and offenders holding such images will face criminal charges and up to three years in prison under new proposals announced by Justice Minister Maria Eagle today.

The proposals were announced as part of the government’s response to a public consultation on the possession of non-photographic visual depictions of underaged children engaged in sexual activity. It acknowledges the view that paedophiles could be circumventing the law by using computer technology to manipulate real photographs or videos of abuse into drawings or cartoons.

Commenting, Maria Eagle, Parliamentary under Secretary of State for Justice, said:

‘These new proposals will help close a loophole that we believe paedophiles are using to create images of child sexual abuse.

‘This is not about criminalising art or pornographic cartoons more generally, but about targeting obscene, and often very realistic, images of child sexual abuse which have no place in our society.’

The distribution or sale of material is currently illegal under the Obscene Publications Act, and possession of photos of child pornography is unlawful, but it is not yet a criminal offence to possess drawings and computer generated images of child abuse. The proposals announced today will create a new criminal offence to possess drawings and computer-generated images of underaged children in sexual activity.

Notes to editors

1. The Consultation on the Possession of Non-Photographic Visual Depictions of Child Sexual Abuse was launched by the Home Office on 2 April 2007 and closed on 22 June 2007.
2. For further enquiries, please call Suzanne Colley on 0207 210 0675.”

BBC News: Computer generated abuse ‘banned’

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

BBC NEWS | UK | Computer generated abuse ‘banned’: “Computer generated abuse ‘banned’

Drawings and computer-generated images of child sex abuse would be made illegal under proposals announced by Justice Minister Maria Eagle.

Owners of such images would face up to three years in prison under the plans.

The Obscene Publications Act makes it illegal to possess photos of child abuse but it is legal to own drawings and computer-generated images.

Ms Eagle said the proposed move would ‘help close a loophole that we believe paedophiles are using’.

The plans are part of the government’s response to a public consultation exercise carried out last year. ”
The government has acknowledged that paedophiles may be circumventing the law by using computer technology to manipulate real photographs or videos of abuse into drawings or cartoons.

A Ministry of Justice spokeswoman said the authorities had “noticed an increase in the existing availability of these images on the internet”.

She said: “If we do not address the issues these images raise now it is likely their availability will continue to grow.

“They are often advertised as a legitimate depiction of child sexual abuse.”

‘Unacceptable’ images

The spokeswoman said police and child welfare groups had expressed concern at the “growing increase in availability of these depictions of child sexual abuse”.

Ms Eagle said the plans were “not about criminalising art or pornographic cartoons more generally, but about targeting obscene, and often very realistic, images of child sexual abuse which have no place in our society”.

Shaun Kelly, safeguarding manager for children’s charity NCH, said the proposals were a step in the right direction.

He said: “This is a welcome announcement which makes a clear statement that drawings or computer-generated images of child abuse are as unacceptable as a photograph.

“It adds to the range of measures to help ensure the safeguarding of children and young people.”

UK Researcher detained for downloading Al-Qaida manual

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

Student researching al-Qaida tactics held for six days, EducationGuardian.co.uk

· Lecturers fear threat to academic freedom
· Manual downloaded from US government website

Polly Curtis and Martin Hodgson, Saturday May 24, 2008, The Guardian

A masters student researching terrorist tactics who was arrested and detained for six days after his university informed police about al-Qaida-related material he downloaded has spoken of the ‘psychological torture’ he endured in custody.

(more…)

YouTube law fight ‘threatens net’

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

US – YouTube law fight ‘threatens net’: “(BBC)
A one billion dollar lawsuit against YouTube threatens internet freedom, according to its owner Google. Google’s claim follows Viacom’s move to sue the video sharing service for its inability to keep copyrighted material off its site. Viacom says it has identified 150,000 unauthorised clips on YouTube. In court documents Google’s lawyers say the action ‘threatens the way hundreds of millions of people legitimately exchange information’ over the web. They also maintained that YouTube had been faithful to the requirements of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act and that they responded properly to claims of infringement.”

(Via QuickLinks Update.)